Gallery

Gallery | The Romans in North Britain: the Antonine Wall

Ask most people what the northernmost frontier of Roman Britain was, and they would probably say it was Hadrian’s Wall. But there was, for a short time, a boundary further north: the Antonine Wall, now a World Heritage Site. This ran between the Firth of Clyde in the west and the Firth of Forth in the east. This Gallery features images from one of the bath-houses on its route, and… Read more

Gallery | Masks

Traditionally, Thespis was credited with introducing masks to indicate different characters in theater, although Aristotle says: "Who introduced masks or prologues, the number of actors, and so on, is not known." In earlier periods maks were created for burials, the most famous being the so-called “Mask of Agamemnon” discovered during excavations at Mycenae. In this Gallery, we share images of masks from the classical world. Read more

Gallery | Hēraklēs, part 2: Other depictions of Hēraklēs

"Even by the look of him it was plain that he was a son of Zeus; for his body measured four cubits, and he flashed a gleam of fire from his eyes; and he did not miss, neither with the bow nor with the javelin." Apart from the Labors, there were many other episodes in the myth of Hēraklēs, and these also provided inspiration for artworks and visual representations. In… Read more

Gallery | Hēraklēs, part 1: the Labors

The Hēraklēs myths have inspired many artworks from classical times onward: he is probably the most represented of all the ancient Greek heroes. So we have prepared two galleries with a selection. This first includes depictions of the Twelve Labors of Hēraklēs. Read more

Gallery | Trojan Women

The themes depicted in the myth of the fall of Troy inspired ancient Greek tragedies, such as the Trojan Women of Euripides, and writers and dramatists of later periods. The subject has also been depicted in the visual arts. This gallery presents a selection of these artworks, including paintings, and ancient Greek vases. Read more