Topic for Discussion

Community Discussion: Fostering Civil Dialogue

In this clip Professor Nagy responds to a question about whether or not heroes can hope to achieve something that is beyond their portion or fate [huper moiran]. Nagy argues that within the ancient Greek song culture, the poetic phrase "beyond fate" can be equivalent to saying something is "beyond tradition." This idea becomes especially clear when Achilles and Aeneas, "two men who were by far the best," face off… Read more

Under discussion: “That Man!”

The active interaction among the bard, internal audience and the external audience in a Homeric performance intrigued me. I wondered how the external audience, in the 5th century BCE, processed such a complicated narrative (Homeric Iliad and Odyssey). How did they kept them near and dear to their song culture? Read more

In Focus: Iliad 9, lines 524–528

|524 This is how [houtōs] we [= I, Phoenix] learned it, the glories [klea] of men [andrōn] of an earlier time [prosthen], |525 who were heroes [hērōes], whenever one of them was overcome by tempestuous anger. |526 They could be persuaded by way of gifts and could be swayed by words. Read more

In Focus: Homeric Hymn to Herakles 4–6

4 He [= Hēraklēs] used to travel all over the boundless earth and all over the sea, |5 veering from his path and wandering off, all because of the missions assigned to him by Eurystheus the king. |6 He [= Hēraklēs] performed many reckless things on his own, and he suffered many such things in return. Read more