Apollo

Artemis, pourer of arrows

I wanted to look at the two short Homeric Hymns to Artemis, #9 and #27, and to think about what kind of narrative or myth might have accompanied either of these Hymns, if we take them as prooemia, and to see what key words stand out. Do they have much in common, or do they concentrate on different aspects of Artemis? Read more

Divine Deceiver: Hermes in the Homeric Hymns

"I will swear a great oath by my father’s head and vow that neither am I guilty [aitios] myself, neither have I seen any other thief [klopos] of your cows —whatever cows may be; for I know them only by hearsay [kleos].” Following the recent posts "Divine Doppelgänger: Hermes and Odysseus" and “The Divine Doublet: Odysseus and Hermes," I became intrigued to learn more about Hermes as deceiver, as portrayed… Read more

Homeric Iliad 1.1–67

As you well know the first word of the poem, mēnis, indicates ‘anger’, as both Greg and Lenny have so carefully discussed. This first word establishes a tone or mode for the complete work as anger is exchanged through an economy of metaphors with violence, death, grief, lamentation, and ultimately with kleos itself as the final price of an heroic life: that is, the poetic medium of this narrative song.… Read more

The Mountain Gods and Musical Contests

It is odd that a culture that seems to personify most natural features as deities has so few gods of the mountain peaks.There seem to be only ten mountains called “god.” Three of them, Helikon, Cithaeron, and Tmolus, have distinctive myths or personalities. Cithaeron and Tmolus are associated with Dionysus, Helikon more famously with Apollo and the Muses. These three mountains are also associated with musical contests. Read more