Homeric Hymns

Divine Deceiver: Hermes in the Homeric Hymns

"I will swear a great oath by my father’s head and vow that neither am I guilty [aitios] myself, neither have I seen any other thief [klopos] of your cows —whatever cows may be; for I know them only by hearsay [kleos].” Following the recent posts "Divine Doppelgänger: Hermes and Odysseus" and “The Divine Doublet: Odysseus and Hermes," I became intrigued to learn more about Hermes as deceiver, as portrayed… Read more

The Divine Doublet: Hermes and Odysseus

His story starts in a cave far from the company of the blessed gods in the care of a daughter of the Titan Atlas. His story often ends in a cave too. In between, he slays a giant shepherd with an unusual number of eyes, is connected with the slaughter of sacred cows, smells the aroma of broiling steak but does not partake, and is involved in meals with appropriate… Read more

In Focus: Homeric Hymn to Herakles 4–6

4 He [= Hēraklēs] used to travel all over the boundless earth and all over the sea, |5 veering from his path and wandering off, all because of the missions assigned to him by Eurystheus the king. |6 He [= Hēraklēs] performed many reckless things on his own, and he suffered many such things in return. Read more

Under Discussion: Is Anchises a Casanova?

One of the texts we are reading in the community is the beautiful Homeric Hymn to Aphrodite. Quoting an eighteenth-century adventurer, Casanova, might seem an odd start to a classical study. It is clear in the Hymn that the mighty goddess will say whatever it takes to consummate her Zeus-given passion for the Trojan prince Anchises. Read more