names

Eurycleia and Anticleia

Continuing our look at the etymology of proper names, it is interesting that the two women who jointly raised Odysseus have very similar names: Eurycleia means "broad fame," and Anticleia means "opposing fame." Do their names constitute a clue concerning their respective attitudes towards Odysseus' quest for kleos by joining the expedition to Troy? Read more

Transcript: CHS Open House, with Gregory Nagy, on nostos, Names, and the Younger Generation of Heroes

We were pleased to welcome Gregory Nagy, and Allie Marbry, for another CHS Open House session. Following last week's conversation, and in conjunction with the readings of the Book Club, our discussion topics included questions from the community about some of the issues that emerged from those conversations. This event is available only in transcription, as a PDF handout. Read more

Under discussion: What’s in a name?

I was fascinated by the recent CHS Open House discussion about names as micronarratives, and in particular how the name of a son can reflect a main characteristic of the father. One example mentioned was Telemakhos “he who fights at a distance.” I was wondering what other examples the community could find, and maybe try to explore some of these questions: Read more

Video—CHS Open House with Gregory Nagy and Guests on the Odyssey, Kingship, and Nestor

Professor Gregory Nagy (Harvard University) Professor Leonard Muellner (Brandeis University), Douglas Frame, and Allie Marbry, join for a CHS Open House Discussion. Questions discussed included: How is kingship depicted and does it reflect the historical situation? If Nestor is 'never at fault' does that affect how we can understand his role in the Odyssey? Is Odysseus the last of the epic heroes, and if so, what about Telemakhos' generation? Read more