ships

The Essential Ship | Part 1: The Dipylon Vase

During the Geometric period potters start to enrich the decorations of vases with forms of people, animals and—in the so-called Orientalizing style—with lions, panthers, rosettes, palmettes and lotus flowers. Lastly, in the Late Geometric Period, the artists start to communicate with the viewer by adding narrative content into the decorations. This content includes depictions of ships. Read more

The Theoretical Ship

The myth of Theseus’ sacred journey’ continued to be re-enacted in an Athenian state festival held in honor of Apollo at Delos. The ritualized journey in which the two-times-seven Athenian youths sailed to Delos and back again to celebrate that they had been saved was called a theōriā. But what evidence is there about what this ship looked like? Read more

Gallery: Chariots and Transportation

This gallery displays different means of transportation used by the Ancient Greeks: chariots, horses, ships. Chariot were also associated with funerals. In the following passage, Achilles is honoring Patroklos: 'But Achilles would not let the Myrmidons go, and spoke to his brave comrades saying, “Myrmidons, famed horsemen and my own trusted friends, not yet, I say, let us unyoke, but with horse and chariot draw near to the body and… Read more

The theōriā and the Ship of Theseus

During our study at HeroesX, I was thrilled by the Hour 23 discussion about the sacred journey [theōriā], the never ending objective of Socrates to enter into dialogue with anyone he encounters. The first text is from Plato's Phaedo: "...Theseus went to Crete when he took with him those famous two-times-seven young people. He saved [sōzein] them and he too was saved . And they were said to have vowed to… Read more

Hesiodic Advice on Oinops

In our initial discussions we concentrated on the Homeric epics and identified some of the themes that appear in our focus passages. When we viewed together the main subjects surrounding the words appearing with oinops—pontos, ‘sea’, and bous, ‘ox’, we started to see a connection with seasonality, so we decided to look in more detail at the two oinops passages in Hesiodic Works and Days. Read more